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Recent Reviews

The Bride Test by Helen Hoang

A year ago


She did it again guys!

This was another completely romantic and full of amazingness read. This novel follows Michael's cousin Khai. You can read this without reading The Kiss Quotient. Khai is Autistic and the first half of an arranged marriage to a beautiful Vietnamese woman names Esme. This isn't the arranged marriage type thing that you think, so don't let that steer you away. This is one of those books that surprises you in ways you never see coming and you fall completely in love with both characters. All in all a lovely read with characters that I fell for, I will continue to read Helen's books and I love that she challenges you as a reader.

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Synopsis:

Khai Diep has no feelings. Well, he feels irritation when people move his things or contentment when ledgers balance down to the penny, but not big, important emotions—like grief. And love. He thinks he’s defective. His family knows better—that his autism means he just processes emotions differently. When he steadfastly avoids relationships, his mother takes matters into her own hands and returns to Vietnam to find him the perfect bride. As a mixed-race girl living in the slums of Ho Chi Minh City, Esme Tran has always felt out of place. When the opportunity arises to come to America and meet a potential husband, she can’t turn it down, thinking this could be the break her family needs. Seducing Khai, however, doesn’t go as planned. Esme’s lessons in love seem to be working…but only on herself. She’s hopelessly smitten with a man who’s convinced he can never return her affection. With Esme’s time in the United States dwindling, Khai is forced to understand he’s been wrong all along. And there’s more than one way to love.